Wednesday, February 27, 2008

HD video online for existing machines is now here

We make it now possible to get original-quality video in the smallest file sizes on any host. People can watch the best quality HD television-like network programming, similar to having 'cable service', on their existing computers or phones. Intel and others will help create future systems to do this, and what we are talking about works on the systems of today and will also make future systems work better. We enable media in the best quality HD possible to be watched now by the currently installed base of millions without upgrades or plug-ins.

To watch HD video online with existing wireless mobile notebook computers has not been possible with existing video transcode solutions at typical bit rates until now. Original video files are often too huge to use while compressed videos distributed online today are shown in hard to see little windows and ugly to watch when expanded. As a solution, we have created the world's best video compression. In development for seven years our 'patent pending' process allows television quality on existing installed systems without change to any hardware or software. Original-quality smaller-sized compressed video files help those who move video files around online or otherwise. Below and on our Video Examples page you can see our solution in action. On this page are ours, Sony, Comcast, YouTube, and MySpace implementation examples for the same media. Our customers get more bandwidth, additional storage, new solutions, and expanded capabilities.

Video compression helps distribute end-results with superior quality over any connection including: broadband, DSL, H.264, wireless, cell phones, dial-up, cable, mobile devices, 3GP, MPEG-4 (MP4), military systems, RF, wideband, PCIe, Advanced Switching (, satellite, and even USB. We increase possibilities at any bandwidth!

Here is a side by side comparison of different HD video online so you can see the difference. In this case we will use the Disney Narnia Movie Trailer 3 1080p video obtained as a 172 Mb file, with a 3000k bits per second (bps) bit rate, at 24 frames per second (fps) downloaded then compressed from:

This video we compressed 12x into a 14.5 Mb file, with a bit rate of 800k bps, at 29.97 fps - looks fairly good.

This video is one we compressed 23x into a 7.7 Mb file, with a bit rate of 400k bps, at 29.97 fps - looks a bit fuzzy while is still way better than YouTube

Some of us need reading glasses to see the difference, but with them on it is clear. We are better than all others with the same media clip at the same file size, same bit rate, and have a superior reduced frame rate. When comparing videos look at the sharp edges, fast moving objects, and pause once in a while at fast moving times to see still frames. A trick of the filmmakers is to not have the background change much so they can look the best possible in digital video. Note we often use a higher frame rate than this original, 30 frames per second (fps), as is better for movement of subjects such as in an action film, news, or sports media.

What would you like to talk about? All feedback on our webpage or this blog is welcome. Please come back and see the changes as this blog and our webpage ( are both 'under construction' nightly in attempt to let the world know our new video compression transcoding deinterlacer scaler software enables among other things: HD video online full screen at wi-fi speeds, the best looking video on all mobile devices, and the highest quality end user experience to existing as well as future displays with advantages through having the smallest file sizes for any situation. Our sound quality and synchronization are also the best after compression when delivered - crank up some good speakers as you watch the examples on our Main Page to hear the difference between us and Sony, Comcast, MySpace, and YouTube.

Shaun Maki
smaki at designavs dot com

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